Characters in the Bible (5): Isaac and Ishmael

Isaac was Abraham's promised son. The covenant God made with his father continued through him. The Bible gives relatively little information about Isaac. He is especially contrasted with his half-brother Ishmael. The promised "offspring" When the LORD promised Abraham to give him many descendants, there was an obvious problem: his wife Sarah was not able…

The Bible as the Word of God

Short lecture at Reformation Day Event, October 29, 2019, at Living Hope Free Reformed Church in Chatham, ON. One key issue in the Reformation was the place and importance of the Bible. The Reformers insisted that the Bible is the Word of God. Today, most Protestant and so-called “evangelical” churches follow in the footsteps of…

Characters in the Bible (4): Abraham and Sarah

Abraham has a unique place in the history of redemption. The LORD called Abraham to belong to him in a special way. This was the beginning of the covenant between God and his people, which eventually would lead to the birth of the Saviour, Jesus Christ, through whom all nations share in the blessing of…

Covenantal and Experiential Preaching

In my essay on redemptive-historical preaching, the focus was on the content of the sermon. Now I will focus on the recipients of the sermon: who are addressed and in what way? A first answer is found in the Canons of Dort, 2.5. “Th[e] promise [of the gospel] ought to be announced and proclaimed universally…

Redemptive-Historical Preaching

This article addresses a focus in preaching that is practiced in the Reformed churches, and which I also much utilize in my own sermon-writing. Redemptive-historical preaching is neither a preaching style nor a homiletical method. The adjective “redemptive-historical” expresses the homiletical and exegetical concern that full justice must be done to God’s great plan that…

On Christian Education

What is Christian education? It is not simply about the organization or the participants: you can have a Christian school association, Christian students, and Christian teachers, without teaching in a particularly Christian manner. Is it about curriculum? A Bible class would be obviously Christian in content; and you might think of Christian biology in terms…